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Email: Michelle@making-strides.ca

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Holistic Nutritional Consultant

Advanced Metabolic Balance Coach

Women Talk Events, Calgary South Director

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Certified Professional Co-Active Coach

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Coffee - Who can drink it and who should avoid it?

October 18, 2017

 

Coffee is one of those things - you either love it or hate it. You know if you like the taste or not (or if it’s just a reason to drink sugar and cream). You know how it makes you feel (i.e. your gut, your mind, etc.).

 

Not to mention the crazy headlines that say coffee is great, and the next day you should avoid it!

 

There is actual science behind why different people react differently to it. It's a matter of your genetics and how much coffee you're used to drinking.

 

NOTE: Coffee does not equal caffeine. Coffee contains between 50-400 mg of caffeine/cup, averaging around 100 mg/cup. Coffee is one of the most popular ways to consume this stimulant. But… a cup of coffee contains a lot of things over and above the caffeine. Not just water, but antioxidants, and hundreds of other compounds. These are the reasons drinking a cup of coffee is not the same as taking a caffeine pill. And decaffeinated coffee has a lot less caffeine; but, it still contains some.

 

Let's look at caffeine metabolism, its effects on the mind and body, and whether coffee drinkers have higher or lower risks of disease. Then I’ll give you some things to consider when deciding if coffee is for you or not.

 

Caffeine metabolism

 

Not all people metabolize caffeine at the same speed. How fast you metabolize caffeine will impact how you’re affected by the caffeine. In fact, caffeine metabolism can be up to 40x faster in some people than others.

 

About half of us are “slow” metabolizers of caffeine. We can get jitters, heart palpitations, and feel "wired" for up to 9 hours after having a coffee. The other half is "fast" metabolizers of caffeine. They get energy and increased alertness and are back to normal a few hours later.

 

This is part of the reason those headlines contradict each other so much - because we’re all different!

 

The effects of coffee (and caffeine) on the mind and body

 

NOTE: Most studies look at caffeinated coffee, not decaf.

 

The effects of coffee (and caffeine) on the mind and body also differ between people; this is partly from the metabolism I mentioned. But it also has to do with your body’s amazing ability to adapt (read: become more tolerant) to long-term caffeine use. Many people who start drinking coffee feel the effects a lot more than people who have coffee every day.

 

Here’s a list of these effects (that usually decrease with long-term use):

  • Stimulates the brain

  • Boosts metabolism

  • Boosts energy and exercise performance

  • Increases your stress hormone cortisol

  • Dehydrates

So, while some of these effects are good and some aren’t, you need to see how they affect you and decide if it’s worth it or not.

 

Coffee and health risks

 

There are a ton of studies on the health effects of coffee, and whether coffee drinkers are more or less likely to get certain conditions.

 

Here’s a quick summary of what coffee can lead to:

  • Caffeine addiction and withdrawal symptoms (e.g. a headache, fatigue, irritability)

  • Increased sleep disruption

  • Lower risk of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

  • Lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes

  • Lower risk of certain liver diseases

  • Lower risk of death (“all cause mortality")

  • Mixed reviews on whether it lowers risks of cancer and heart disease

Many of the health benefits exist even for decaf coffee (except the caffeine addiction and sleep issues).

 

NOTE: What’s super-important to note here is that coffee intake is just one of many, many factors that can affect your risks for these diseases. Please never think regular coffee intake is the one thing that can help you overcome these risks. You are health-conscious and know that eating a nutrient-rich whole foods diet, reducing stress, and getting enough sleep and exercise are all critical things to consider for your disease risk. It’s not just about the coffee.

 

Should you drink coffee or not?

 

There are a few things to consider when deciding whether you should drink coffee. No one food or drink will make or break your long-term health.

 

Caffeinated coffee is not recommended for:

  • People with arrhythmias (e.g. irregular heartbeat)

  • People who often feel anxious

  • People who have trouble sleeping

  • People who are pregnant

  • Children and

  •  teens.

If none of these apply, then monitor how your body reacts when you have coffee. Does it:

  • Give you the jitters?

  • Increase anxious feelings?

  • Affect your sleep?

  • Give you heart palpitations?

  • Affect your digestion (e.g. heartburn, etc.)?

  • Give you a reason to drink a lot of sugar and cream?

Depending on how your body reacts, decide whether these reactions are worth it to you. If you’re not sure, I recommend eliminating it for a while and see the difference.

 

Some people use coffee to keep them awake and active and have a hard time functioning in the morning before having that cuppa coffee.  If this is you, you may have an issue with your energy via your hypothalamus-Adrenal Axis (HPA).  Unsure if this is you?  Try eliminating coffee from your diet for a week.  If you feel more exhausted, headaches, and just feel you can't function, then you may have an energy issue.  This is where you can find amazing adaptogenic herbs and dietary lifestyle to help rebuild your regularly occurring energy and eventually have that big beautiful Pumpkin Spice Latte without having damaging effects.  Recipe to follow tomorrow

 

 References:

 

https://authoritynutrition.com/coffee-good-or-bad/

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-coffee

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/a-wake-up-call-on-coffee

http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/can-your-coffee-habit-help-you-live-longer-201601068938

http://suppversity.blogspot.ca/2014/05/caffeine-resistance-genetic.html

https://authoritynutrition.com/how-much-coffee-should-you-drink/

 

About Michelle 

Michelle Post is a C.H.N.C. Holistic Nutritional Consultant and Metabolic Balance Coach.  She has a passion for helping you achieve Optimum Wellness by holding Nutrition to a higher standard. She has successfully navigated her own health issues with Crohn's Disease, Adrenal Fatigue, Reproductive Health and Weightloss.  

 

To learn how your personal nutrition can work for you, contact Michelle at (403) 266-2867 or email michelle@making-strides.ca to book your free, telephone 20-minute consultation (value of $40).  

 

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